Monastery of Maulbronn in a Water Drop

⇐ RedcurrantGentle Giant: Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) ⇒

ISO: 320

Shutter: 1/2000

Aperture: f/2.8

Size: 2160x1440

Date: 15/06/2012

By: J├╝rgen Donauer

Camera: Canon EOS 7D

License: CC BY-SA

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I had to wait a little while in the Monastery of Maulbronn (UNESCO World Heritage) and got bored. So I started playing with the fountain and took some shots. Suddenly I realized the you could see the monestary inside the water drop - cool :)

Source: Wikipedia

drop or droplet is a small column of liquid, bounded completely or almost completely by free surfaces. A drop may form when liquid accumulates at the lower end of a tube or other surface boundary, producing a hanging drop called a pendant drop. Drops may also be formed by the condensation of a vapor or byatomization of a larger mass of liquid.

Surface tension

Liquid forms drops because the liquid exhibits surface tension.

A simple way to form a drop is to allow liquid to flow slowly from the lower end of a vertical tube of small diameter. The surface tension of the liquid causes the liquid to hang from the tube, forming a pendant. When the drop exceeds a certain size it is no longer stable and detaches itself. The falling liquid is also a drop held together by surface tension.

Drop Adhesion to a solid

The drop adhesion to a solid can be divided to two categories: lateral adhesion and normal adhesion. Lateral adhesion resembles friction (though tribologically lateral adhesion is a more accurate term) and refers to the force required to slide a drop on the surface, namely the force to detach the drop from its position on the surface only to translate it to another position on the surface. Normal adhesion is the adhesion required to detach a drop from the surface in the normal direction, namely the force to cause the drop to fly off from the surface. The measurement of both adhesion forms can be done with the Centrifugal Adhesion Balance (CAB). The CAB uses a combination of centrifugal and gravitational forces to obtain any ratio of lateral and normal forces. For example it can apply a normal force at zero lateral force for the drop to fly off away from the surface in the normal direction or it can induce a lateral force at zero normal force (simulating zerogravity).

Droplet

The term droplet is a diminutive form of 'drop' - and as a guide is typically used for liquid particles of less than 500 µm diameter. In spray application, droplets are usually described by their perceived size (i.e., diameter) whereas the dose (or number of infective particles in the case of biopesticides) is a function of their volume. This increases by a cubic function relative to diameter; thus a 50 µm droplet represents a dose in 65 pl and a 500 µm drop represents a dose in 65 nanolitres.

Speed

A drop with a diameter of 3 mm has a speed of approximately 8 m/s. Drops smaller than 1 mm in diameter will attain 95% of their terminal velocity within 2 m. But above this size the distance to get to terminal velocity increases sharply. An example is a drop with a diameter of 2 mm that may achieve this at 5,6 m.

Tags: macro, water, drop, monastery, world heritage, maulbronn

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